Basic Study

Quantitative changes in 8-OHdG caused by microwave irradiation on colon cancer

The colon cancer tissues were irradiated 2 times for 2 seconds each time at 3-second intervals from a distance of 20 cm using a microwave generator unit.  Subsequently, the amount of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in the tissues was measured by competitive ELISA method (Results of a study by Kyoto Sangyo University).
     8-OHdG is a sensitive marker of the effect of active oxygen on organisms; therefore, it is currently most widely used as an oxidative stress marker for assessing in vivo oxidative stress.  In particular, the increase of 8-OHdG in chromosomes is thought to be associated with an increased carcinogenic risk; accordingly, it may be possible to detect any increase or decrease in the risk of cancer by measuring the levels of this marker present.  In this experiment, the amount of 8-OHdG present in colon cancer tissue was measured before the microwave irradiation (Pre.), 5 minutes (Post 1) and 15 minutes (Post 2) after irradiation.  The results are shown below.  The density at which 8-OHdG was present in DNA rapidly decreased immediately after the microwave irradiation, then subsequently rose again. At Post 2, 15 minutes later, it still remained at a density lower than that measured before irradiation. These results suggest that microwave irradiation decreases the oxidative stress which is caused by active oxygen and can promote the canceration of colon cancer tissues. The results suggest microwave irradiation displays an immediate effect in reducing the oxidative stress caused by active oxygen, an effect which is also thought to contribute to the alleviation of cancer energy.

 

Quantitative changes in 8-OHdG caused by microwave irradiation on colon cancer tissue

 

Changes in 8-OHdG DNA ratio caused by microwave irradiation on colon cancer tissue